“Even if I’m wrong, I’d be happy” – Famous Harvard Professor Says Oumuamua Is Alien Object

The first interstellar asteroid: `Oumuamua. This unique object was discovered on 19 October 2017 by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawai`i. Subsequent observations from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that it was travelling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. `Oumuamua seems to be a dark red highly-elongated metallic or rocky object, about 400 metres long, and is unlike anything normally found in the Solar System.

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A year ago, astronomers spotted a strange object barreling through our solar system on a very weird path — the first discovery of an interstellar object, now called ‘Oumuamua, which means “messenger from afar” in Hawaiian.

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The first interstellar asteroid: `Oumuamua. This unique object was discovered on 19 October 2017 by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawai`i. Subsequent observations from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that it was travelling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. `Oumuamua seems to be a dark red highly-elongated metallic or rocky object, about 400 metres long, and is unlike anything normally found in the Solar System.

During the abrupt flyby, scientists made frantic observations of the object before it passed out of range of even the most-powerful telescopes. Ever since then, ‘Oumuamua has provided scientists a seemingly endless supply of questions, with most answers still very much up in the air.

Here is a graphics of the unexplainable trajectory of Oumuamua:

The strange trajectory of the interstellar object OUMUAMUA that is against all physical laws and that left scientist baffled.

Astronomers got their first glimpse of ‘Oumuamua on Oct. 19, 2017, through the Pan-STARRS1 telescope based in Hawaii, which is fine-tuned to catch temporary phenomena like passing comets. Right away, scientists knew this wasn’t your average comet; its path was way too strange. They’d caught sight of the object on its way out of our solar system, so scientists are still trying to figure out where its journey began. [‘Oumuamua: The Solar System’s 1st Interstellar Visitor Explained in Photos]

Here is a video of the strange trajectory of Oumuamua (starting at 0:40):

‘Oumuamua has also endured a bit of an identity crisis during its first year in the scientific literature. At first, astronomers thought it was a comet. Then, they realized there was no cloud of gas and dust enveloping the object, so they reclassified it as an asteroid. But that proved problematic when they realized it was moving faster than an asteroid ought to be, as if getting a little boost of speed from volatile materials evaporating off its surface, like those that form a comet’s surrounding cloud.

Another puzzle is the object’s strange shape: long and thin, something like six times longer than it is wide. That’s unlike most cosmic objects, which are generally lumps. It’s also spinning strangely, tumbling end over end like a stick tossed for a cosmic dog. Some of the hypotheses to explain that elongated shape are that ‘Oumuamua had a messy run-in with an asteroid or that the incredible gravitational pull of a giant planet stretched the object.

Because they can’t gather any more data about ‘Oumuamua, scientists have turned their attention to spotting another such interstellar visitor, hoping to find one sooner rather than later. (Researchers have said the objects should be pretty common, and scientists had in fact been waiting for a flyby like ‘Oumuamua’s for decades.)

Harvard Scientists Suggest Interstellar Object Could be Sent by Aliens

“‘Oumuamua,” the first interstellar object observed in the solar system, could be a probe sent by intelligent life elsewhere in the universe, according to a paper published by Astronomy Department Chair Abraham “Avi” Loeb and Shmuel Bialy, a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

‘Oumuamua — which Loeb said means “a visitor from a great distance” in Hawaiian — was first discovered in October 2017 by a telescope in Hawaii. It has since moved out of the range of satellites and rockets, making it very difficult to study its composition and leaving its galactic origins a mystery.

The interstellar object is an anomaly for several reasons, Loeb said. After analyzing sunlight reflected from its surface, he and Bialy concluded that the object is at least five to ten times longer than it is wide and potentially cigar- or pancake-shaped, much more elongated than the typical asteroid.

But ‘Oumuamua’s defining characteristic — and the primary reason why scientists believe it could be a probe from an alien civilization — is the “extra push” in its trajectory, which propels it forward more than the sun’s gravity alone could, Loeb said. One possibility is that ‘Oumuamua is a comet because they too have an extra push, caused by ice evaporating on their surface and creating a rocket-like appearance. But Loeb said the comet hypothesis doesn’t match observations of ‘Oumuamua.

“In that case, we should have seen a cloud of dust or gas around it, because when you look at comets, you see a cometary tail,” he said. “But there is no evidence for anything like that.”

Loeb instead theorized that ‘Oumuamua’s unusual trajectory was caused by “radiation pressure” from the sun pushing it like a sail. For this to be the case, the object would have to be less than a millimeter in thickness.

“Light sails — sails that are pushed by light — are being contemplated now in space exploration,” he said.

Loeb currently chairs the Breakthrough Starshot Initiative, which aims to create this exact kind of technology for astronomical research. He and others are in the process of designing a lightweight sail propelled by a powerful laser that will be able to search for life in the Alpha Centauri star system. He suggested that ‘Oumuamua might be a similar effort on the part of other civilizations.

“I admit, my imagination is limited to what I know, but that’s true for everyone,” Loeb said. “I was inspired by my involvement in this project.”

Loeb said he was surprised by the overwhelming interest — both from distinguished astronomers and the general public — in his paper. He said the paper was accepted for publication only a few days after its submission, an unusually fast turnaround in the scientific community.

“I think the public is very interested in this subject, and scientists very much shy away from this,” Loeb said. “For me, personally, it’s a completely legitimate thing for us to consider because a quarter of all stars have habitable planets like the Earth that could have liquid water on its surface and the chemistry of life as we know it.”

Despite ‘Oumuamua’s puzzling characteristics, Loeb was hesitant to definitively classify it as an object of alien origin.

“I prefer not to assign probabilities to the nature of ‘Oumuamua,” he wrote in an email. “We just need to be practical and collect more data on it or other members of its population. The interpretation of existing and future data is my plan for the future.”

Sources:

https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/news/759/nasa-learns-more-about-interstellar-visitor-oumuamua/

https://www.space.com/42216-interstellar-object-oumuamua-one-year-later.html

https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2018/11/14/oumuamua-alien-probe/

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